22 September 2016

For the love of Gitchee Manitou

Please, no more of this "10,000 years of oral history" bullshit... Christopher Pauchay couldn't even remember where he left his kids...insert alt text here

On its website, Ogimaa Mikana says it hopes "to restore Anishinaabemowin place-names to the streets, avenues, roads, paths and trails of Gichi Kiiwenging (Toronto). "These were the names thousands of years ago when the First Nations people were here."
Hang on a sec there, Chief... you're saying a bunch of illiterate stone-age tribal nomads had pre-existing names for hundreds of streets that didn't actually exist until the land was overrun & developed by their colonial oppressors?

Big medicine, brah.


14 comments:

Anonymous said...

owg............just shakes his head.

Bill Elder said...

Along with 10000 years of oral history they have millennia of architectural design, civil engineering and city planning which defined their kulchur - they were just waiting for some wetback colonists to actuate their plan and do all the grunt work. - they like to delegate donchano.

Side note - are you experiencing the same level of toxic shock as I do when exposed to hollow virtue signalling and historical denialism?

Iconoclast said...

And these names, thousands of years old, were written using the Roman alphabet. Give me a break.

Neo Conservative said...

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well, let's not overlook our part in this nonsense... we treat these folks like small children, indulging all their cultural fantasies... and setting up special aboriginal programs & exemptions.

the feds give their chiefs 12 billion dollars per year which goes who knows where... the justice system gives special exemptions to aboriginal lawbreakers and we set up special aboriginal prisons for those we can't catch & release.

changing history to suit them just seems to fit right in there.

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ebt said...

Davenport Road actually is a prehistoric trail and has been in use along its current course for a good 10,000 years. There are couple of other ancient trails preserved in the Toronto street system, most notably Indian Road by High Park

Neo Conservative said...

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i love reading early canadian history and am always interested in knowing more. i have never seen any reference to prehistoric trails in what is now downtown toronto. would you be able to give me a refererence to your source materials?

my point, of course, is that i very much doubt that these name changes reflect anything that a pre-literate stone age tribe might actually have called any of these current urban deer trails. it's simply another politically correct gesture designed to appease whatever squeaky wheel is currently in vogue.

ps. curiously, i also had an apartment in a house on indian road in the 1980s. very little evidence of the indigenous peoples was still around... but hey, good to know.

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Bill Elder said...

Neo - Davenport road was "deemed" by "local" 19th century paleo-archeologists to have been a late ice age trace used as a portage route around "lake Iroquois" (Lake Ontario during the glacial melt phase. However this "fact", like so many others that are accepted as scientific truth, has thin evidence to support it and a lot of speculation. The theory has never been challenged and in light of the dark cloud of political correctness we live under now will remain a quasi-myth out of multicult politics.

If it was true that the population of glacial lakes region was so dense that they wore trace ruts into the topsoil (glacial till?) I highly doubt if these stone age tribes were even speaking Ojibway let alone having a vocabulary large enough, nor the writing skills to leave a record of place names.As you say, so much of the aboriginal history is romanticized bunk, it defies scrutiny by true scientific method.

Neo Conservative said...

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bill, thx for that.

all i'm asking for here is a scientific citation that shows that davenport road was once known as "gete onigaming".

surely no one would actually change all these street signs based on the aboriginal equivalent of "aunt sally says..."

i mean... would they?

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Dollops said...

There are still traces of the ancient "grease" trails in NW BC. They were still in use when I was a child (not quite 10,000 years ago) and, as I understand it, had no names beyond those given to points along the route. Tsimsian geography consisted largely of places where food was gathered and each was identified in some mnemonic manner such as "where the bear rests" and "where storms happen". Interestingly, a lake would have no name but different spots along the shores would have unrelated names.
And that, I like to point out to Indian lore dilettantes, would have been the way of all of the peoples in glacial retreat Europe and Asia. It was contact with more advanced cultures that moved Northern Europeans out of their hunter-gatherer phase; Amerinds simply remained isolated until condescension became fashionable.

Bill Elder said...

The French (Brule) were the first to explore the region with friendly native guides no records exist in Jesuit documents about GTA trace names in the region - perhaps it came from the records left by the Brit colonial agents who were surveying the area for settlement as early as 1760.

Roads for the movement of troops supplies and colonization were surveyed even before their was settlement - these crown agents were probably using guides who may have left records of native place names for existing pathways - but I doubt it TO city council went this far with research to verify the native place names they dote on

Neo Conservative said...

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"dollops says... 'where the bear rests'"

again, guys... i'm looking for specific historical citations that would justify renaming all these modern day toronto streets.

i get that pre-literate tribesman "oog" would meet his neighbour/brother "zoog" down at "creature trail by big rock" to try scare up their next meal... but uncritical acceptance of this politically correct happy horseshit in toronto's annex is simply beyond laughable.

not that it's any of my brebeuf, you want something that jives with historical reality, let's rename "sainte-marie among the hurons" as "tasty place big medicine missionary stew pow-wow".

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Neo Conservative said...

"bill elder says... 'probably using guides who may have left records of native place names for existing pathways'"

you have a citation/source for that, right bill? otherwise ANYONE can similarly state... "probably was aliens from alpha centauri who may have left records of interstellar place names for existing pathways."

you get my point... right?

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Bill E said...

Well my poit was Neo that the existing colonial documentation does not contain specifics like these place names, which means we are mimicking the native oral tradition in confirming these names - the equivilent of - oh well that's what great uncle harry used to call it too.

Neo Conservative said...

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"bill e says... native oral tradition"

when neophyte was a toddler, he had a similar tradition. you could catch him with big smear of chocolate on his face... but, if you asked him if he knew anything about a missing batch of cookies, he would swear up and down it was a complete mystery.

that's why it's called evidence... and why it's the basis of our systems of reasoning, evidence and medicine.

toss it out at your peril.

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