29 January 2008

My own personal Chalk River

Here at the Halls we're having a bit of an infrastructure problem.

Like a lot of our neighbours, we heat with wood, but the Halls have been built so tightly, we need a constant supply of fresh air to keep the fire going... and to carry away any by-products of combustion that might escape the stove.

Unfortunately, last week... we found out about a recall on a part for our air-exchanger. After contacting the manufacturer we were told that they were sending us a replacement part, but that we had to shut down the air exchanger until it arrived. The company talked about “overheating”, but I suppose what they really meant... was that our house could burn down.

So the options here are... shutting down the unit and go without heating... which means heading for a hotel until the part arrives... or continuing to use the unit until the part arrives at the end of the week.

Now given that the unit has been operating flawlessly since it was installed in 1995... I did a little calculation.

I figure the odds of the unit bursting into flames and burning down the house... before we get our part at the end of the week... is somewhere between Stephane Dion finding his missing courage and Elizabeth May becoming Prime Minister of Canada.

So anyway... I've made an executive decision here. And unless this blog suddenly goes suddenly goes silent in the next couple of days... you'll know that it was the right choice.

That sounds so familiar.

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RELATED: Of course, this is execu-speak for...

"She has her head up her ass."

"We nuclear engineers, we like belts and braces, and then we keep our hands in our pockets," he said, referring to the overlapping safety systems.

"She's saying that if we take our hands out of our pockets, our pants will fall down, even though we've got belts and braces."
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7 comments:

Dave Hodson said...

It's probably a bigger risk to shut the stove down. With reports of some Canadian cities dipping into the -30s during the day and -40s overnight, you could have yourself a huge plumbing mess with pipes bursting in the cold!

Neo Conservative said...

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"Dave Hodson said... It's probably a bigger risk..."

pipes bursting, massive disruption to our lives, the expense of a hotel, the rabbit boarded at the vet... no more school bus, so taking the boy to and from school... it goes on and on.

i thought this was an interesting juxtaposition to the chalk river situation.

in that situation, the alternative, of course, was to get unreasonably hysterical like some unnamed leader of an opposition party... and try score political points off a non-crisis.

that steffi... he's a piece of work.

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Dave Hodson said...

that steffi... he's a piece of work.

Well, he's certainly a piece of something!

Anonymous said...

That's a real keen situation you have there!

Neo Conservative said...

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"anon cracks... a real 'keen' situation..."

who says vaudeville is dead?

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Anonymous said...

If the odds are a thousand to one, take it.

At Chalk River, the 'automatic' switch to the back-up power supply for cooling pumps was apparently the 'big scary problem' that the massively overpaid bureaucrat used to shut down the reactor.

Unless everyone leaves at the end of the day - what the hell is the problem? Is it staffed by Homer Simpson types that are too stupid to flick a switch if they see the lights go out?

She should have been fired long ago. Of course standards have changed, but so what - the reactor's been going for fifty years! Too stupid.

Neo Conservative said...

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Curiously, the Globe and Mail, while screaming "scary, hidden agenda", glosses over the unanimous vote in Parliament that hammered this evil nail into the coffin of democracy.

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