27 March 2008

Maple Syrup Update - Day 2

Be careful what you wish for.

Conditions today were apparently some sort of arboreal "perfect storm"... for the production of maple sap. Came home from a seminar on organic farming to find Mrs. N hip-deep in magic elixir.

There was a mad scramble to find containers to hold the raw sap... we ended up using the flour and sugar canisters off the kitchen counter, to hold all the stuff we couldn't get into the big stock pot and the slow cooker.

Did I already mention the three containers out on the deck?

Everyone has headed off to bed. I'll babysit the big stock pot for a while and we'll finish this lot off tomorrow morning... just in time to empty our six buckets again.

I think we're gonna have to press our big water-cooler jug into service.

All I can say is... this had better be some damn fine syrup.

A.M. Report - okay, still below freezing... not much in the buckets right now

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FROM THE COMMENTS:

"Just remember: you are doing it for LOVE...forget the fact that when you add in your costs for the energy to boil the sap, the time spent, etc., you are creating a $200 bottle of syrup!"
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5 comments:

hunter said...

I sense a monster has been created, wasn't it you who said, it's only 6 trees????

Neo Conservative said...

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nope... what i said was 6 buckets... on 3 trees... and if the sapstorm happens again tomorrow, we'll be swimmin' in the stuff.

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hunter said...

Oh dear, swamped with 3 trees, aren't you glad you didn't tap 6????

Ever think about asking someone for help?

Good luck, I'm still waiting for my taste test!

James Goneaux said...

Just remember: you are doing it for LOVE...forget the fact that when you add in your costs for the energy to boil the sap, the time spent, etc., you are creating a $200 bottle of syrup!

But it will be the best $200 bottle of syrup you'll ever taste. Use it sparingly...

Rich said...

James you are right on target with the first line of your comment...great stuff!
About 50 years ago as a little gaffer I remember wanting to do the maple syrup thing with the big maple in our front yard. We had just learned about it in school and I wanted to give it a go. My parents said there were two kinds of maple; one that had sap that would 'work' and the other kind that didn't work.
Ours apparently was a non-worker...or so they claimed.
I always wondered if that was true; I know there are hard & soft maples but do the soft maples not have sugar in the sap?
And how would one know which is a hard maple & which is a soft maple?
(I ask this knowing full well that I may get a response that will retroactively damage my trust in my parents. LOL)